alarm-ringing ambulance angle2 archive arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up at-sign baby baby2 bag binoculars book-open book2 bookmark2 bubble calendar-check calendar-empty camera2 cart chart-growth check chevron-down chevron-left chevron-right chevron-up circle-minus circle city clapboard-play clipboard-empty clipboard-text clock clock2 cloud-download cloud-windy cloud clubs cog cross crown cube youtube diamond4 diamonds drop-crossed drop2 earth ellipsis envelope-open envelope exclamation eye-dropper eye facebook file-empty fire flag2 flare foursquare gift glasses google graph hammer-wrench heart-pulse heart home instagram joystick lamp layers lifebuoy link linkedin list lock magic-wand map-marker map medal-empty menu microscope minus moon mustache-glasses paper-plane paperclip papers pen pencil pie-chart pinterest plus-circle plus power pushpin question rain reading receipt recycle reminder sad shield-check smartphone smile soccer spades speed-medium spotlights star-empty star-half star store sun-glasses sun tag telephone thumbs-down thumbs-up tree tumblr twitter user users wheelchair write yelp youtube

Taking Care of Your Eyes in the Digital Age


From the moment we get up to the moment we go to bed, more and more of us are on our smartphones, tablets, computers or other digital devices. That’s a lot of eyeballs glued to a lot of screens.

If you count yourself among the 90% of adults who spend two or more hours a day in front of a screen of some sort, there’s something you should know: You could be putting yourself at risk for digital eye strain, also known as computer vision syndrome.

It’s a problem that is occurring more and more frequently — even in kids.

Symptoms may include dry, red and irritated eyes, fatigue, eye strain, blurry vision, problems focusing, headaches, and neck and shoulder pain.

Digital eye strain — more common than you think

When spending long periods of time concentrating on digital devices, the blink rate may be reduced by up to 66% on average, resulting in dry, itchy or burning eye.

Other factors include the size of the font, your posture, your computer set-up, and the amount of blue light emitted from your screen.

Take steps to protect your eyes now

The good thing is that if your screen habits put you at risk for digital eye strain, there are a number of steps you can take to protect your eyes.

  1. Build a workspace that promotes good posture. Center your computer screen at arms-length and slightly below eye level. This helps you keep your back straight, and helps you maintain a proper distance from your screen.
  2. Position your screen to minimize glare. Do not tilt it upward.
  3. Some eye doctors recommend investing in computer eyewear with an anti-reflective lens that can also be combined with a specially formulated coating that blocks and selectively absorbs blue light.
  4. Follow the 20/20/20 rule: Take a 20-second break every 20 minutes, and look at something at least 20 feet away.
  5. Adjust the brightness of your device. Consider changing the background color from bright white to cool gray.
  6. Lessen the amount of overhead light and surrounding light competing with your device’s screen.
  7. Increase text size to make it easier to read.
  8. Don’t forget to blink. Blinking lubricates your eyes so they stay moist and healthy.
  9. If you have children, consider limiting their screen time, and reducing your own screen time to set a healthy example.

Talk to your eye care professional if you think you’re at risk

While it would be ideal to cut down the amount of time you spend in front of a screen each day, it’s not always realistic. Let your eye care professional know if you are on digital devices excessively. Especially if you wear contact lenses. Fortunately, there are contact lenses that are designed specifically for the digital age, like Bausch + Lomb ULTRA® contact lenses. They feature MoistureSeal® technology, which helps lenses maintain 95% of their moisture for a full 16 hours.

If you’re at a screen more often than not, and you wear contact lenses, be sure to talk to your eye doctor about which lenses are best for you.

Bausch + Lomb ULTRA and MoistureSeal are trademarks of Bausch & Lomb Incorporated or its affiliates.

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.